The Social Enterprise

An occasional blog on the work, partners and ideas of The Social Enterprise…

Happiness is a pitch for philanthropy

with 2 comments

Young British Jews are giving less to Jewish causes and to all charitable causes, and feel no responsibility to give more, reported the first and thus far only systematic study “Patterns of charitable giving among British Jews” (Institute of Jewish Policy Research, 1998).

Happy Givers, a program launching in London September 23, will introduce what some feel is a missing factor amongst young Jews balancing whether and how to give philanthropically: peer pressure.

Happy Givers will introduce public competition into the giving process through quarterly events. For each, four projects will be selected based on innovation, need, and interest. Any charity with a Jewish connection — supporting Jews in need or Jews helping others in need – may apply, with smaller projects prioritized. At the event, the presenters have six minutes to make the case for deserving funding using any means: film, comedy, even in-person appearances from beneficiaries. The audience has a six-minute window to fire off questions. Then, the audience votes. Attendees are given back £10 of their £20 entrance fee to add to their personal funds to publicly pledge to the project of their choice. The £10 balance covers the cost of organizing the event and grant administration.

The competition between the charities is designed to appeal to our generation, brought up on the likes of X Factor and Big Brother.

“When the idea of such competitive and public giving was suggested, I must admit I was not immediately convinced,” says Teddy Leifer, 26, a founding member of Happy Givers and creator of RISE Foundation, which funds education programs for underprivileged children. “From personal experience, I know how hard it is pitching to prospective donors. I can only consider how much more daunting that would be in front of a live audience, and then having to face their vote.”

“But the more we considered the possibility,” Leifer adds, “the more sense it made, knowing how easy it is to give little or nothing at all at synagogue or charity dinner appeals with pledge cards. There is no fun in that either. But whether this model of giving is ultimately successful will be proven by the funds raised. ”

Ivor Baddiel and Tracy-Ann Oberman compere the first Happy Givers

That is where the MC will be critical. A UK Jewish television celebrity will cajole and encourage the audience to secure ever-greater sums, which the group hopes will be matched by an established philanthropist. The aim is to raise at least £1,000 per project at the first event, which over 100 young Jews will attend, before it is matched.

The Happy Givers idea was developed by Dame Hilary Blume, Director of the Charities Advisory Trust and leading social entrepreneur. Previous projects include restoring an Indian palace in Mysore as a community-run Green Hotel, pioneering ethical present-buying catalogues, and Peace Oil, a joint venture between Israeli and Palestinian olive farmers.

First published: PresenTense Magazine, October 2009 Issue.
For more information on PresenTense Magazine, please visit: http://www.presentense.org/magazine

 

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Written by thesocialenterprise

September 17, 2009 at 8:16 am

2 Responses

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  1. its a great mitzvah to be involved in this ….

    nina epstein

    February 3, 2011 at 8:08 am

  2. […] Survivors Fund (SURF) was fortunate to have been amongst the organisations presenting at the most recent Happy Givers. […]


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